Skip to main content

About your Search

20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5
and broadening opportunity for the middle class is shrinking our deficits in a balanced and responsible way. and for nearly two years now, i've been fighting for such a plan -- one that would reduce our deficits by $4 trillion over the next decade, which would stabilize our debt and our deficit in a sustainable way for the next decade. that would be enough not only to stop the growth of our debt relative to the size of our economy, but it would make it manageable so it doesn't crowd out the investments we need to make in people and education and job training and science and medical research -- all the things that help us grow. now, step by step, we've made progress towards that goal. over the past two years, i've signed into law about $1.4 trillion in spending cuts. two weeks ago, i signed into law more than $600 billion in new revenue by making sure the wealthiest americans begin to pay their fair share. when you add the money that we'll save in interest payments on the debt, all together that adds up to a total of about $2.5 trillion in deficit reduction over the past two years -- not cou
the deficit. so you have to open the door to private investment to do this job of rebuilding the power platform in the united states. >> host: and the technology aspect of that is? >> guest: technology aspect is manifold. and price performance improves every 18-24 mocks. in the last year we have gotten into the innovation cycle in batteries so by the end of 2020 electric vehicles will actually be price competitive with grass-driven cars. the problem with these things is that we can't wait. we can't wait because of the environmental effects and we can't wait because we need the economy to grow quickly right now. so the book lays out a whole bunch of different ideas for bringing private investment much more quickly into the job of rebuilding the power grid. >> host: on this show, a series on the international power plant, and he doesn't necessarily agree that the internet is completely green or is terribly green. what is your thought? >> guest: he is right about that. people say that data centers in the united states account for 2% of all electricity consumption. if it isn't exactly that
, they are about half way there in deficit reduction, and that modest changes to health care, entitlement spending could accompany the closing the tax loopholes. a marker on a future negotiation. house speaker bane says in response that the house does it job and passes responsible legislation that controls spending, meets our nation's obligations, and keeps the government running. we will insist that the democratic majority in washington do the same. republicans on thursday will have their annual conference retreat in williamsburg, virginia to discuss their debt ceiling strategy moving forward. back to you. >> and speaking of responsible bookkeeping as the president was, you're just getting word the president's budget won't be delivered by the february 4th deadline; is that right? >> yes. a spokesman for the house budget committee confirms the white house communicated to them they will not get their budget to the white house on time. this is a deadline they met in the past, although, it's not like the white house will not come out with their budget. releasing the budget. thanks so much. >> from wa
-interest of the government of venezuela, if you've got a deficit, you know, stop giving oil away. stop subsidizing sales to people. that would be a lodge cl thing -- logical thing to do. and if you had a government that was not as idealogically motivated as the current government, if you had a chavista government not as idealogically motivated as the current government, that would be a real, logical thing for them to do. >> yeah. thank you for those comments. before i go to chris for the last question this round, i want to mention that after that we'll be going to the audience for some of your questions. we'll have circumstance rating microphones, so you can be thinking about the questions. hopefully, the certification to this point has been sufficiently provocative that you'll have a number of questions, and we can go into the procedure for doing that. but just to give you a heads up that that's coming shortly. chris, back to you for really a continuation of where charles left his comments. but i want to press it just a little bit further. you've talked about the democracy side. charles also mentioned
to finance the government deficit, buying a lot of government bonds and at some point that is going to come apart and it might come apart, might come apart in a fashion that is rather like august of 2007 where things seem to be going smoothly and then all of a sudden it all falls apart and the question is do we have adequate contingency plans in place should that happen? >> right. >> i fear we do not. >> before we let you go, when these transcripts come out do they evoke any memories for you good or bad about these meetings? >> oh, well they evoke lots of memories. i haven't seen the transcripts of course. i look forward to reviewing it because that was my last full year in office. it was a wonderful experience to be there. i learned an awful lot. and certainly one of the things i reflect on is the various points that we missed that i missed and my colleagues missed. >> william poole, former st. louis fed president, thank you so much for your time. steve, thanks to you for sticking around. >> my pleasure. >> meantime morgan stanley trading sharply higher after reporting results this morning
Search Results 0 to 4 of about 5